Where the buffalo [used to] roam

Gem Farms bison crossing the New York State Thruway. Photo from the Times Union, http://www.timesunion.com.

Bison can swim?

That was my first thought when I read the amusing but sad accounts about a herd of buffalo that escaped from Gem Farms in Schodack and traveled as many as 20 miles, most of them swimming across the Hudson River, crossing the Thruway and wandering into Bethlehem, where they eventually were dispatched.

My second thought was more somber. Man, bison farming is tough.

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Squash for breakfast? Yes, for this group

Delicata squash on the breakfast menu.

Delicata squash on the breakfast menu.

Sometimes you just have one of those groups that will put all their trust in you, no matter how weird something might seem.

This weekend was one of them. What a treat it was to serve a women’s group from a church in Troy. As I started meeting them, I realized, this was a group that would appreciate sweet potato bread pudding. So I served it again.

When preparing breakfast the next morning, I looked over at the boxes of delicata squash I bought from Mervin Byler’s farm in Minden and thought, “yes.” I was going to serve homefries or sweet potato homefries, but those squash were calling my name. They were halved, dusted with ground chilies, curry powder, salt and and brown sugar and roasted upside down. I quartered them just before serving.

Twenty women. Nineteen portions consumed. Not bad for squash at breakfast.

On the shelves: Adirondack frauds

The Adirondack Park is marked in green. Adirondack Maple Farms is at the bottom, a 15-mile drive from the Adirondacks.

The Adirondack Park is marked in green. Adirondack Maple Farms is at the bottom, a 15-mile drive from the Adirondacks.

When I visit some of my Montgomery County farm sources, I often pass a maple syrup manufacturer in the town of Mohawk, near Fonda.

The name? Adirondack Maple Farms.

I shake my head when I see it. It’s great marketing (and great syrup). But those of us up here know it’s harvested and produced in the Mohawk Valley, well outside the Adirondack Park.

It’s not the only Adirondack geographic fraud.

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